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Intricate Tendencies

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23. Chinese. Libra.
Reblog ALL pug posts!

Every year the graduates in the honor society of my major (EECS, as mentioned in a previous post) puts up a slogan at the engineering commencement as a tradition.

They went with “EECSY & WE KNOW IT” for 2012.

Very nice. But I still think mine - “WE WE WE SO EECSITED” is better… #rebeccablack #justsaying

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#berkeley  #coe  #engineering  #commencement  #hkn  #eecs  #compsci  #electrical  #graduation  #lmfao  #rebeccablack  #friday 

a 7 minute video on my major (well, what used to be my major) yay

— 2 years ago with 3 notes
#berkeley  #cal  #eecs  #electrical  #engineering  #cs  #compsci  #personal 
matthen:

In signal processing, there is a very important way of combining two signals called convolution.  [The german word for convolution is Faltung which means folding.]  Here we start by convolving a square signal with another.  One square is slid across from left to right, and we look at how much area there is under the two shapes (coloured in red). The thick black line measures how big this area is, and that ends up being the convolution. Next we convolve the convolution with another square and keep going.  Note how this makes the curve smoother and smoother, and it is actually turning it into a Bell Curve, or Gaussian.  Can anyone explain why this might be, and hence an interesting link between signal processing and probability theory? [more] [code]

Yay EE20/120.
I remember the professor always bagging people for using the verb ‘convolute’ falsely over ‘convolve’…

matthen:

In signal processing, there is a very important way of combining two signals called convolution.  [The german word for convolution is Faltung which means folding.]  Here we start by convolving a square signal with another.  One square is slid across from left to right, and we look at how much area there is under the two shapes (coloured in red). The thick black line measures how big this area is, and that ends up being the convolution. Next we convolve the convolution with another square and keep going.  Note how this makes the curve smoother and smoother, and it is actually turning it into a Bell Curve, or Gaussian.  Can anyone explain why this might be, and hence an interesting link between signal processing and probability theory? [more] [code]

Yay EE20/120.

I remember the professor always bagging people for using the verb ‘convolute’ falsely over ‘convolve’…

— 2 years ago with 122 notes
#ee20  #ee120  #berkeley  #electrical  #engineering  #convolution  #signal  #bellcurve